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5 Security Threats The VPN Can’t Defend Against


Security is an issue in legacy applications, since many of these older apps were never designed with Internet accessibility in mind. Modern SDP solutions mitigate this security risk by limiting access to legacy applications, separating the application from the network or Internet while adding adaptive controls

Threat 3: Worms

Worm exploits often grab headlines for their ability to spread and self-replicate in a worm-like way, going from computer to computer wreaking havoc. It’s simple for machines to become infected: all it takes is a user joining a worm-infected network via their device. This is why traditional endpoint security platforms can’t add protection. Since such exploitations occur on a network, a VPN solution is rarely prepared to defend against these worm attacks. The best way to prevent a worm exploit from succeeding is via an SDP solution, which allows users finely grained access through a unique identity as well as micro-segmentation to the specific resources required—and not to any others. This means that a single infected smartphone or laptop won’t contaminate the entire network and puts an effective stop to this type of havoc.

Threat 4: Repeated Login Attempts

Much like a Distributed Denial of Service Attack (DDOS)—which is yet another threat whereby an app is overloaded with requests and thus made unavailable—repeated login attacks can trip up VPN solutions. In this type of hack, also called a “brute force attack,” the perpetrator may end up accessing a company’s network by trying repeatedly to determine the password and log in. The advantage of an SDP solution in the face of a brute force attack is that it is designed to flag failed attempts to log in. Additionally, SDP will deny access to someone if it detects:

  • Suspicious login locations
  • Odd times of day for login attempts
  • Changes to posture of device
  • Endpoint has no active antivirus

Threat 5: Legacy apps

Security is an issue in legacy applications, since many of these older apps were never designed with Internet accessibility in mind. Modern SDP solutions mitigate this security risk by limiting access to legacy applications, separating the application from the network or Internet while adding adaptive controls for risk reduction.

In defense of organizational security, one approach to stopping such threats is to build networks around a zero-trust security framework, which puts greater control in the hands of IT to secure employee or contractor access. This is done by identifying those logging in and extending privileges based on their employee profile. In such a zero-trust network environment, legitimate network users do not have to be concerned about dealing with network-security issues because the zero-trust network orchestrates all of the security and access rules on their behalf.

With their ability to secure gateways at the application layer rather than the network layer, software-defined perimeters are a much more effective alternative to modern enterprise security threats than VPNs, since SDP solutions are designed to confront these threats head-on. By replacing broad network access with granular, identity-based access, the SDP’s zero-trust approach to remote access is what enterprises need for reliable protection from a wide range of threats and attacks that can otherwise compromise the enterprise network. In today’s evolving, remote-work-based environment, the SDP is therefore an increasingly popular approach to leveraging zero-trust access.



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